6 Responses to “Republican Koo edges out Chou in Flushing”

  1. George Ito 10 November 2009 at 2:37 pm #

    I was born and raised in Flushing and I was shocked when Peter Koo won the general election. As the Richard had stated in his previous post, Democrats outnumber Repbublicans 6 to 1 but with that in mind the race was far from a landslide. When the results started to trickle down, Chou and Koo were neck to neck until 11:00 when Koo was proclaimed the victor.

    There are 3 reasons as to how/why Peter Koo defeated Yen Chou

    1. Peter Koo won becaused he was more recognized in the Flushing community when being compared to Yen Chou, SJ Jung, James Wu,John Choe, Isaac Sasson, and Evergreen Chou. He became more recognized ever since his failed bid to upset Stavisky and become State Senator.

    2. Peter Koo had a head start to build on his platform and raise money since he had no opponents in the primaries unlike Chou who had to beat out 5 democratic challengers in order to become the democratic nominee.

    3. Peter Koo has been reference as the mayor of Flushing for he spent thousands of his own money to purchase ads in the newspaper and media time. Koo especially went on a “money blitz” during the final stretch of the campaign leading up to the General Elections.

    In true sense, Peter Koo is now our councilman and we as residents of Flushing should give him the support that he needs. I hope that Mr Koo would part himself from John Liu’s way of governing Flushing and represents new blood and new ideas as Koo so touted in his bid for the senate seat and Council Seat

    The Assembly and State Senate races next year are going to be quite interesting because there is a possiblity that Chou, Jung, Wu might challenge the incumbents Meng and Stavisky for their respective seats and who would seek out Peter Koo’s endorsements.

  2. Richard Jannaccio 10 November 2009 at 11:49 am #

    I was born in Flushing, and this is the first time a Republican has been elected to the City Council’s Flushing District 20. Democrats outnumber Republicans 6 to 1 in the District. Any win at all facing these odds is the equivalent of a landslide.
    It was considered almost impossible for Koo to win, given the odds, but many people who voted for Jung or Sasson in the Primary, voted for Koo in the general election.
    No conclusion can be drawn about support for Yen Chou because many of her votes probably came from people who just voted the Democratic line, and did not vote for the person.
    Anyone who gets elected, including Koo, needs the support and guidance of the residents of the district in order to best represent them .

  3. Thomas 5 November 2009 at 1:38 pm #

    This race shows you that money prevails in politics not ideas.

    I also concur with Mr. Jannaccio. Mr. Peter Koo does represent a “marked shift toward the right” as he does not represent new and independent ideas. He represents politics as usual. His vision for District 20 in the upcoming years are poor. Koo even said for himself in this article in that he plans to focus on helping senior citizens and children. What about the economy? What about Housing? What about jobs?

    7,278 voters felt that Yen Chou was not “out of touch with community and in touch with special interests” for they felt that electing Chou was electing for change and progress. In fact if Peter Koo was “a person of demonstrated dedication to the community, the candidate for the people”, this race would have been a sweep in favor of Koo but it wasn’t since 8,212 voters voted for his opponents ( Yen Chou(7,278 votes), S.J. Jung( 664 votes) , and Evergreen Chou( 270 votes))

    I hope Democrats can set aside their differences and assist Peter Koo in running District 20 for he desperately needs it.

  4. Thomas 5 November 2009 at 1:36 pm #

    This race shows you that money prevails in politics not ideas.

    I also concur with Mr. Jannaccio. Mr. Peter Koo does represent a “marked shift toward the right” as he does not represent new and independent ideas. He represents politics as usual. His vision for District 20 in the upcoming years are poor. Koo even said for himself in this article in that he plans to focus on helping senior citizens and children. What about the economy? What about Housing? What about jobs?

    7,278 voters felt that Yen Chou “was not out of touch with community and in touch with special interests” for they felt that electing Chou was electing for change and progress. In fact if Peter Koo was “a person of demonstrated dedication to the community, the candidate for the people”, this race would have been a sweep in favor of Koo but it wasn’t since 8,212 voters voted for his opponents ( Yen Chou(7,278 votes), S.J. Jung( 664 votes) , and Evergreen Chou( 270 votes))

    I hope Democrats can set aside their differences and assist Peter Koo in running District 20 for he desperately needs it.

  5. snarkster 5 November 2009 at 12:15 am #

    This article is misleading. How did S.J. Jung being on the ballot deal “Chou a major blow”??? Even if you took EVERY ONE of Jung’s votes and gave them to Yen Chou, she still would have lost.

    Ridiculous.

  6. Richard Jannaccio 4 November 2009 at 3:44 pm #

    Let’s keep the facts separate from the conclusions.

    The election of Peter Koo does not represent a “marked shift toward the right.”

    Yes, Peter Koo has some basic Conservative views, but the Democratic candidate did not offer a progressive platform and was out of touch, indeed, she was a stranger to the Flushing community.

    Democrats supported Koo the candidate, Koo the person, and especially his strong stance against overdevelopment which diminishes quality of life. This was not a vote for the Republican party platform.

    In the 20th District, the Democratic party label and the principles that it stands for didn’t match the Democratic candidate’s agenda, and the voters understood this.

    Democratic mavericks like Terence Park, Isaac Sasson, Pauline Chu, Ethel Chen, Jimmy Meng, Martha Flores-Vazquez, Richard Jannaccio and others said no to Yen Chou and what she stood for. That was an act of courage and it was the right thing to do.

    We could not support a candidate who is out of touch with the community and in touch with special interests.

    Peter Koo is a person of demonstrated dedication to the community, the candidate for the people, and that’s why he was elected to the City Council– to represent the people.

    The better candidate won. Let’s celebrate!


Leave a Reply to George Ito